@mblafreniere

Last reply

mblafreniere

Exercise with *some* reward

Last Thursday, I set out to start exercising regularly again. Before my first major episode, I went to the gym 3-4 times per week, and had set up an at-home alternative in the form of weights and exercise-based videogames. I became fatigued so quickly after my most recent major episode that just doing errands or making minimal physical effort for 10 minutes was exhausting... but it got better since then, so I figured I'd start it up again. It was great! I felt good and was in a good mood the whole evening afterwards. B U T I've never been so sore for so long after a workout, even after intense gym workouts where I went way too far! It might sound like the kind of thing you say when you get older, but it feels really different. Two days later and I still walk like I just stepped off a horse after a 3 hour ride. Is it only because it's been a while? Is it maybe made worse because of MS? Either way, I'm thankful that the pandemic means I wasn't going anywhere...

watsoncraig

@watsoncraig

Hi, have a look at theMSgym onFacebook

JamesC83

@JamesC83

@mblafreniere first thing: do not freak out if symptoms are exacerbated from a work out, just make sure you schedule in half an hour to hours rest. I, like you, push it to the extreme. I just make sure I have plenty of fluids, music for motivation and something to balance myself when the inevitable happens. In terms of reward, before Xmas, I got increased muscle thickness around shoulders and arms. What helped was cutting the crap, one 24hr fast a week , plenty of supplementation and some high intensity cardio as well as the usual resistance stuff. My symptoms get to the point where I can’t see and can’t stand but always return to normal levels.

JamesC83

@JamesC83

@mblafreniere sorry missed the point of your post. Soreness; I don’t think it’s MS related. It’s just lactic acid build up in the muscles and MS only affects the CNS not the muscles themselves. Having said that, do check with an MS neurologist.

mblafreniere

@mblafreniere

Thanks for all the info all! Turns out it's a mix between normal after-workout muscle soreness and some fun extra leg numbness, haha. That said, I'll try to take it easier next time. @JamesC83 I'll make sure to schedule more downtime, thanks for the advice. I never have problems gaining muscle mass, but if I don't watch what I eat at the same time, obviously it gets me hungrier and I just gain all kinds of mass, which is another challenge too. So yeah, I still have to watch what I eat, but I don't think I could manage fasting; my mood gets so foul that it might lead to my committing murder... ;)

cameron

@cameron

Just to add to the mix: in my second year of MS I had a city holiday with friends. There was far too much walking and I didn't enjoy it at all. The day before our return I developed severe muscle pain in both legs and arms. I felt absolutely dreadful, it didn't go away and in the end I had to refer myself to the relapse clinic. I was expecting tea, sympathy and possibly steroids. Instead I had a sever telling off. I was told that I'd put my musculo-skeletal system under severe strain and that the damage wouldn't mend for six weeks. What on earth were you thinking of? - I was asked. I felt like replying ' trying to have a normal holiday'! I don't know what was going on in my body, but I do know that with MS muscles tire easily. I've been told since: 'the moment you start aching/hurting is the moment the exercise stops doing you good'.

Tracey1982

@Tracey1982

I go on my stationary bike to exercise I try and do 1 hour a day but sometimes my legs have had enough after 30 mins but I suppose it’s better than nothing

mblafreniere

@mblafreniere

I have to get in a different mindset, I suppose. I used to just power through because the adrenalin makes it so that if you push it, it gets better. I have to listen to my body a bit more!

1

H222

@H222

Yes it is great everyone can TRY just carry on trying :') doing something is better than doing nothing :')

mblafreniere

@mblafreniere

One of the things that has been most difficult to accept is the things that I can't do. Consulting with medical professionals, seeking treatment, staying active, those things I can do. The issue is sometimes not to fret about what I can't change...