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itsmewithms
3 months ago

If you use the little magnifying glass in the upper left you can put in searches on an tags put on posts. You should get some results if you try diet or fasting or holistic or any specific diet you are interested in.

My husband has UC and follows a very strict diet an it definitely helps him. He will be trying the “Fasting Mimicking Diet” and encouraged me to check it out. When I talk to my Dr he says diets aren’t proven to help, clinically, and when I was at Mayo Neurology (Rochester MN) they said they don’t encourage anyone to eat all cheeseburgers as they are Drs ;-0 but again couldn’t say any diet could be seen to cure MS. If you search you will see that people on this forum have tried and fared better and worse on different diets.

This is what my husband wants me to check out…I’m already at an acceptable BMI and except for eating out am primarily on a paleo compliant diet as well as just starting ocrevus https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/310597.php#1


stumbler
3 months ago

@jerome_teetee_gray , there are many suggested diets, with some having contradictory regimen.

The best thing to do is keep a food diary. Then you can look back and try to identify any potential bad stuff when you have a bad day.


itsmewithms
3 months ago

@jerome_teetee_gray @stumbler and I would also add that keeping a consistent regimen over a period will also help. Some food/additives, etc may have a delayed effect and some will be more immediate. My husband will switch things up almost daily sometimes and blame his symptoms on what he had for breakfast or lunch ;0 and maybe that is ok for his UC type of issues as he is focusing on what is in his digestion tract at the moment. For MS I look more at a general trend of choices over time so try not to switch things up continually. Right now I am just starting Ocrevus so trying to make that the main thing my body is working through at the moment-


rel12
3 months ago

Hi @jerome_teetee_gray!

Yes def! I know for some it does not make much of a difference. I immediately switched to gluten-free/dairy free diet/lifestyle. It has helped me so much! I noticed that eating foods that were anti-inflammatory kept my MS symptoms in control. Being on a gluten free diet for about 2 years, I can now see the difference if I grab a beer (has gluten) it would make my leg heavy/numb.

What diet are you looking into?


cameron
3 months ago

I have no faith that it impacts the MS directly but I believe that one’s overall health certainly does. The fitter we are, the less likely we are to accumulate other conditions which WILL worsen MS, because they put additional strain on our already compromised brain. So in my book, whatever diet improves health is good news. We’re all different in our tastes and I don’t believe any one regime is superior…. it’s just not likely to be the chocolate biscuit diet!


tracey_kilgour
3 months ago

Absolutely. I started keto and my symptoms improved significantly. I eat real food, nothing processed. Real fat like butter, lard, olive oil. Fat my grandma used. I walked a straight line at my last ms clinic visit. I have been going once a year for 20 years and never walked a straight line before. My neurologist said the diet was promising, but couldn’t recommend it to all patients until further research was published.


jaye
3 months ago

I went off gluten and dairy initially and found that it had a huge impact on my overall fatigue and many of my symptoms lessened to a more manageable level. I was in bed a good 85% of the time and in a wheelchair if I went out due to fatigue, balance issues and my brain just not being able to handle a lot of stimuli … after changing my diet I felt like I got my life back.
Now I also have Interstitial Cystitis as a bonus prize and have had to further curtail my diet to reduce these additional flare ups. I am a gluten free vegan and I don’t eat processed foods or those with additives/preservatives plus as I did what was suggested above by others and kept a food diary I know that potato isn’t a big winner for me so I stick to sweet potato instead. So, no coffee, tea, alcohol, tomato based foods, strawberries, cranberries, things with vinegar in them, spicy stuff, citrus or anything too acidic or dark chocolate for me either to help keep the IC a bit less fiery . But as for the other MS symptoms, once I got rid of the gluten and dairy things definitely improved and have continued to remain at a more manageable level for the past 7 years.


nutshell88
3 months ago

I’ve had MS since 2004. havent been on any diet all my life. I fast 1 month a year.
but I never eat like regular people my apeitie is bad and my weight is so low 43 hight 157cm a child eats more than me i slip main meals and get full so quick :/ its causing me troubles its genetic my family are like that. symptoms accures pnce a year i stopped MS tmts for 9 yrs began this year
im still 100% fine apart from many scary silent lesions atrophy poor balance on stairs. im saudi woman been on part time job since graduation uni 2011 but now planning to have full time job at Aramco


cameron
3 months ago

I said I don’t personally believe the link is direct but I do think that upset/infection/food intolerance makes the MS worse. I agree with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall who argues that with wheat and dairy we’re all somewhere on a continuum. Some people tolerate it perfectly but modern day bread has more gluten than it ever used to (apparently) so it’s not surprising that many people feel better when it’s cut out or reduced – and dairy is everywhere! Same thing applies.


lisa_back
2 months ago

Hi all, I have read your comments with interest. I am hopefully due to start OCREVUS soon. I haven’t changed my diet as yet, but will keep a food diary as suggested alongside my symptom diary so I can monitor any benefits.


jayney007
2 months ago

I believe firmly in OMS and if you’re unsure re diet and lifestyle check out their Holism longitudinal study. I fell of their diet in last 4/5 months and I notice the difference!! Less energy and higher spasticity and heaviness in legs. I have joined an OMS circle and the folks are amazing! And their stories of following the OMS lifestyle are truly inspiring. Interestingly one is a consultant with MS!! My neuro also in full agreement with following it


itasara
2 months ago

My son is a researcher at the aging institute in CA and he thinks fasting is a benefit for everyone especially autoimmune diseases. I have not had specific MS sx since the 1st major one – transverse myelitis- that led to my dx. Ive been on MS med for 12 years and this year came off. Occasionally I have MS hugs. I keep to a low carb diet as much as possible and feel good. Today I watched on Netflix a very interesting documentary called “The Game Changer” about diets; Very interesting on the value off plant based diets.,


lisa_morghan
2 months ago

A Healthy diet is always best its not easy but fruits veggies always a plus more lean meats but most stay away from hard drugs !!! Weed is okay my doctor gave me a 👍 but i really really try to stay healthy
In our toxic world !!! Best to you


cynder
2 months ago

I’ve had MS sine 1992 and been predominantly vegan for most of that time. I transitioned to SPMS after about 22 years. I’ve done Prolon fast mimicking 6 times and had significant, though short-lived, improvements 4 times. The best thing about my improvements in that I am reassured my body can still perform tasks I thought I’d forever lost the ability to do. The best example is that I was able to climb the stairway all by myself after not being able to get beyond the first step for nearly a year.

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