@crockett32

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crockett32

Foot drop exercise

Wow. When I posted my first post I didn't even notice the search option. 198 results on foot drop lol. Well, my question this time is if you exercise your head off (foot drop-specific exercises), can you make up for years of not knowing what was going on?Or I don't stand a chance?

NumptyDumpty

@NumptyDumpty

Stretch, stretch and stretch some more. I think that's the think most likely to help with any real improvement, or at least slow down things getting worse a little. I have foot drop on left foot and a little on right. I have a FES and also a couple of AFO'S and all help with getting a heel strike first, although none are a magic bullet.

watsoncraig

@watsoncraig

If the”magic bullet” does exist, shoot me now! I have foot drop and I have stretched and exercised galore, use a “foot up” have tried both a FES and AFO but it’s still that the signal just doesn’t get there. Until myelin can be repaired I think the damage is done

crockett32

@crockett32

@numptydumpty and I suppose if you add ankle, posterior tibialis (and all other adjacent muscles) exercises better no?

NumptyDumpty

@NumptyDumpty

@crocket32 Yep, I guess that we are all really just experimenting on ourselves in some way. As watsoncraig says, the real damage is done, everything is just trying to figure out what further damage limitation we can do.

ItsMewithMS

@ItsMewithMS

It sounds like you are working pretty hard on this. I think I had pretty subtle foot drop issues for years and also a weakness in my right foot from the start as I had an accessory navicular bone removed as a teenager that left the foot a bit flat...then dislocated the big toe in an auto accident that left me avoiding walking and using the foot properly for a year. The impact of a weak ankle/foot ended up resulting in enough of a gait impact that my hip was affected and over time had to be replaced. Several articles I read and PTs emphasize that when one joint is weak/damaged the other joints that have to pick up the load will then be impacted. So now I also make sure to strengthen the full system and give it proper care and not just focus on the area that is hurting but support the surrounding joints and muscles that are carrying the load- Good luck with it- as you have seen it is a common issue. I saw in a map on Dr Boster's site that a lesion in a particular area of the spine, right where I have one, this is a likely consequence.

Stumbler

@Stumbler

@crockett32 , exercise is good and beneficial. Whilst I agree that myelin damage cannot be repaired, it may be possible to open up alternative neural pathways. The brain can be clever like that..........

crockett32

@crockett32

@stumbler I hope so. But giving up is not an option anyway.

VanessaJ

@VanessaJ

@crockett32, don't give up and definitely keep exercising. I've had footdrop for the last 10 years and thought the damage was already done- until I started physio 6 months ago. It was the best decision I made. I think you need stretching and exercises tailoring specifically to your own footdrop weaknesses rather than generic ones. My physio has been fab and I am now starting to get a heel strike when I walk which I've not had for years. Good luck and keep exercising!

crockett32

@crockett32

@vanessaj I will. Hopefully I can stretch a couple of muscles enough just to improve my gait.