Last reply 3 years ago
The wobbles

Hi has anyone got any ideas how I can help my drunk look I’m concentrating so much on trying to walk normal with stiff legs that I’m wobbling all over the place realy have no idea wot I can do that will help x

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melissa-g
3 years ago

I wonder if maybe a neuro-physio could help with this a bit. At the very least they could assess your walking and maybe adjust some of the things you are doing to make up for any weakness/stiffness


stumbler
3 years ago

A Neuro-physio assessment is always a good call to specifically identify areas of weakness and prescribe exercises to adjust.

But, walking like a drunk seems to be a characteristic of MS.

We do need to try and maintain the form and suppleness of our muscles. Possibly, Pilates and/or yoga classes may help to address the stiffness. 😉


caterpillar
3 years ago

Oh, fighting the wobbles… @stumbler and @melissa.g are right – try a neuro-fysio assessment for some guidance.

But you can start at home while waiting for neuro-fysio:

http://www.mstrust.org.uk/atoz/exercise.jsp

Strength training focusing on the lower body + core muscles is important. The ideal would be at the gym twice a week with some help/guidance plus exercises with f.example resistance bands at home as often as you can bear :-).

I also do balance exercises daily and can recommend the set from mstrust site.
http://www.mstrust.org.uk/information/exercises//default.jsp#tab03

I would say strength training, core training and balance complement each other, forgetting one of those won’t get you wher you want to get.

And don’t give up on it too easily ( “it is just the way it is”), it takes time for things to get better ( weeks to months, so be patient!)

There was a thread earlier this week “How to turn a fall into a roll”, where @cameron talked about pilates – yoga and pilates are good for MSers, so consider giving it a try :-). It is never too late to start, I began pumping iron last year after 9 years with MS ( somehow it is easier for neurologists to push pills than to push exercise! 🙂


nrl321
3 years ago

Hi @Katrina42 I can relate to the comment about the ‘Drunk Look’
I have previously been refused entry to clubs/pubs because I apparently had TOO MUCH to drink, that’s funny because I just drove there sober as a judge!
I recently visited a Physio who gave me some core exercises and it’s amazing how much my body is reacting to simple exercises.
And keep up some sort of stretching but that will be part of Yoga and Pilates anyway. (Truth is I don’t do Pilates or Yoga but probably should).


reddivine
3 years ago

Do you use a stick? Might be time to consider one, even its when your outside. Truth be told, the nations streets and roads can be a nightmare if you are wobbly..uneven paving, fast cars.
At least with a stick you can crack a few ankles…or skulls if you’re really cross!
And don’t be fooled into the “oh sticks are so “old peeps” mindset! Plenty of folks on shift have to use em, all ages.


sunnydaylover
3 years ago

exercise is good @caterpillar, i am trying my best to get back to strength training, but depending on others is a nightmare…grrrr. As for wobbling, I want the t shirt that says “I’m not drunk, I have MS!” LOL


Anonymous
3 years ago

Wow thank u everyone for
all ur help and u have all given me things to b thinking of insted of felling sorry for my self thank u all xx


sarfrazarif
3 years ago

The hardest thing for me to accept was that I needed a stick to maintain balance and to stop ‘accidentally’ falling into people.

However, using an elbow crutch has been liberating, allowing me to walk further with more stability. It also means I’m not falling into people or being mistaken for being a drunk in a suit

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