Last reply 1 month ago
I have forgotten how to run

I don’t really know how to explain this – but I don’t know how to physically run or jump any more. My body doesn’t seem to know how to do it – does anyone else understand what I mean/has anything similar happened to anyone else. I understand logically that those movements are something you learn as a child – so I guess that the bit of the brain that knows how to do these movements can be disrupted and that knowledge can be ‘unlearnt’ but it is very very odd – please someone let me know I am not alone …

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karen51
2 months ago

I “forgot” how to climb stairs. It was explained to me just that – the electrical impulses from my brain to my leg are disrupted. But you can create new, secondary pathways. There’s a whole lot of explanation as to how and why this happens and how the secondary pathways are created, but it will take pages for me to explain it. I have learned about that by research and talking to my doctor and other caregivers. And I know that I still only understand a very tip of that iceberg. At any rate – there is hope. I went to physical therapy where my therapist determined that my hamstring wasn’t “firing”. The electrical impulses weren’t getting there or they were being delayed. So she gave me many exercises that I can do to force it to “fire”. And hence, I am creating a secondary pathway. I do these on somewhat of a regular basis – as I feel the need and am able – some are better done standing up, some sitting down, some laying down, etc. As long as I continue to force that muscle to “fire”, my brain will maintain that secondary pathway and I can climb stairs. I do hold the railings just in case, but I can climb stairs again. Best wishes to you!


orange76
2 months ago

@karen51, thank you so much for sharing that, can i ask did you approach/organise the physical therapist yourself or get referred through gp/neurologist? Thank you

Oh I know it so well. I cannot for the life of me remember these things anymore. It gets me down (probably more often than I admit) as I used to love running, playing football. I do get jealous of people ‘just walking’ as I think ‘so simple why can’t i do that?’ As @karen51 states you can create new pathways with work!

A referral to a decent physio will help! I got one through my neurologist.


dominics
2 months ago

@karen51 – over the last 26y I have had really odd things come and go. Never running, but other things.

The strangest thing is that just when I chalked it up to something I used to be able to and had to accept the loss of it just came back. This is a very strange disease!

Excersising as and where and how you can is always worthwhile, as is a decent neurophysiologist.


rivka
2 months ago

I feel your pain, @orange76, big time. I can no longer run or jump, and I get so frustrated. It’s impossible to explain to others, too. I used to run daily, and do martial arts. Sigh. I haven’t gotten anywhere with PT, but I just try to walk daily and stay calm and mostly cheerful. Oh well.


cosine
2 months ago

My left leg forgot how to walk! But my right leg could do it. And my left leg did it in slow motion! But i seemed to walk ok if i was holding onto something. Weird. But gabapentin helped me!


karen51
2 months ago

@orange76 – I was referred to physical therapy by my neurologist. And though it works, it is very challenging at times. There are times that I have to seriously concentrate to make my leg lift to the next stair. Sometimes I have to even stop conversation to think hard until my leg moves. But there are other times that it will do it much more easily. I just keep concentrating on it because it is my understanding that this will only get worse if I don’t force my brain to do it. And it will probably get worse if I do, too. But hopefully it will take longer. For now, I’m doing as much as I can to remain as mobile as possible for as long as possible. This is a very frustrating disease for sure.
@stallionicchampionic and @dominics – I used to run 4 miles almost every day. Now I have a lot of trouble walking around the block. If I want to do something that requires me to be on my feet for long periods of time I rest a lot the night before. It’s a lot of work to think about making sure that you can move around! I do very much miss being as active as I used to be.
@cosine – YES! Walking and stair climbing is much easier while holding onto something. It helps me keep my balance so that must be one of those other things going on in the brain that is being blocked. The brain is such a fascinating organ. It’s too bad that we don’t know enough to cure some of these ailments yet.


cosine
2 months ago

@karen51
Oh good I’m not imagining it! Ive yet to see my neuro for that 3rd time get my second mri and or LP. My first MRI was clear! Would you believe crazy stuff like this has been happening for over 3 years but no diagnosis yet!


potter
2 months ago

Before I was diagnosed with MS I rode my bicycle nearly everyday. I had just started my ride when my legs wouldn’t move up and down. I balanced on my bicycle telling my legs what to do, didn’t happen. I got off my bicycle and walked it home and sold it. I thought I was losing my mind so I didn’t tell anyone what had happened. I was diagnosed a few years later when I was 55, I had symptoms since my 20’s but was treated like a hypochondriac. Once I was diagnosed it became clear as to what was going on. Potter


alex_knowles
2 months ago

@orange76

Been there.
Over many years
tried to overcome.
Didn’t.

This was pre-diagnosis when I was a keen runner footballer cycling Walker badminton player outdoorsy type….And then got my MS stamp

Clearly many of us have had to fight and-or accept the loss


alex_knowles
2 months ago

@orange76

Been there.
Over many years
tried to overcome.
Didn’t.

This was pre-diagnosis when I was a keen runner footballer cycling Walker badminton player outdoorsy type….And then got my MS stamp

Familiar story to many others I can see….It’s a question of maintaining what you’ve got, grieving any loss and acceptance.

I wish you well. Keep safe and positive


sfrox
2 months ago

I’ve had mild instances of this. The other morning while standing, I went to to lift my leg to put a sock on or take it off. I tried once, couldn’t do it, and then after pausing to focus was able to do it.

I do believe Neuro-plasticity and physical fitness are very real things. So I’m going to keep pushing things for as long as I can, however I can. Wishing all the best in this journey.


dominics
2 months ago

@karen51 – Boy do I feel your frustration. I used to row, cycle and climb pretty seriously. Now I have to go on the rowing machine, daren’t climb at all and have changed all my nice roadbikes into a single Brompton that I potter about on in town. Any big effort and I am essentially borrowing energy from tomorrow.

For some reason, I thought a standing desk would be ideal. 30 min at that and I am knackered. Sitting it is!

Stay sane and do what you can.

Best,

Dominic


doubleo7hud
2 months ago

I now remember what it was like to be a toddler. See a shiny thing you definitely should not run over and grab, make a run for it and your face takes detour in the worlds biggest pile of fecking Lego. Legs still stuck on point A the feckers have not even moved a inch. Kiss my arse running your a ****.


cameron
1 month ago

To add to comments about neuroplasticity, my physio explained the importance of keeping on with exercise/repetition of specific movements. Even if the movement you’re trying to do isn’t perfect, you must still practise it regularly. The memory of the perfect movement is held in the brain cortex: if you stop practising it, this memory is lost forever. This also explains the necessity of getting yourself analysed by a neuro physio. You need to know EXACTLY where the deficits are and which muscle groups are involved before you can start work on creating alternative neural pathways. Apparently, it takes a minimum of 500 reps before the brain begins to register that it’s being required to work differently…..


grandma
1 month ago

I have to ‘look’ at my legs to make them work. I have found that visualising, staring at them and usually swearing at them works well! Certainly in the early days when getting any physiotherapy help was virtually unheard of. Thank goodness our wonderful NHS has finally worked out that helping us to stay on our feet will ultimately save them money!🥊😜

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