novemberrain 07/04/18
Last reply 3 months ago
Equality Act 2010 Disclosure for employm

Hi I could do with some help please! I am filling out a job application and it asks “Do you have a disability as defined by EA 2010?” I can say yes, no or refused. I am cautious about this. I have had benign MS for 20 years and temporal lobe epilepsy for 5 (caused by demyelinating lesions). I have no physical disability and no relapses unless you call the TLE a relapse? Am I obliged to disclose all my history. I don’t want to open a can of worms here. Any advice would be most welcome please.

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novemberrain
3 months ago

I am medicated for TLE btw but not MS


ebaldwin
3 months ago

You don’t have to tell thembut they can’t turn you away just because you tick yes.if you feel like you can handle the job and do it to a great standard then go for it, I told my job about my disability and it’s never been an issue if anything they always ask if I’m alright and if I need a break.


vixen
3 months ago

Hi @novermberrain, just found this on the MS Society website:
Do I have to tell my employer?

Most people with MS don’t have to tell their employer about their diagnosis. However, you must tell your employer about your MS if:

you work in the armed forces
your MS may affect health and safety in the workplace
you drive for your job
If you are asked if you are disabled for the purposes of the Equality Act or the Disability Discrimination Act, you must answer yes, regardless of whether you consider yourself to be disabled. These laws specifically define MS as a disability from the point of diagnosis, so to answer no would be dishonest.

Should I tell my employer, even if I don’t have to?

If you need any support at work – such as reasonable adjustments or time off for appointments – you may decide to tell them.

Even if you don’t need any support, you may still want to tell them so they’re aware in case things change in the future. This can help to avoid any misunderstanding if any of your symptoms – particularly hidden symptoms such as fatigue – start to affect you at work.

I find this annoying; it seems that we don’t need to disclose to an employer unless we are required to sign a form relating to the Equality Act. Almost discriminatory in itself, if you ask me!


mrvelocity
3 months ago

You are better off telling an employer about disabilities upfront because they can place you in a better role and they aren’t allowed to discriminate against you. If there is something you withhold from them that later affects your work, you could find that you run the risk of it affecting your employment. Even IBS or Back Pain should be mentioned because I almost lost a job because of IBS flareup. You need to tell them and if you have any issues, they will know and can adjust accordingly.


novemberrain
3 months ago

Thank you @ebaldwin. I think I must be honest and say yes. It then asks what my “disabilities” are in vague subheadings such as learning disabilities. I think I will say I prefer not to disclose at this application stage and discuss later at interview when it comes up which I’m sure it will. They can see for themselves. Only a 3 year post anyway…


novemberrain
3 months ago

Were you already employed @ebaldwin? I do believe these are 2 distinct situations.


novemberrain
3 months ago

Thanks guys thats really helpful. Very strange and unsettling to have to say I’m disabled but they asked and I must do the right thing here. Cognitive impairment is a subheading. I will say I prefer not to disclose. I will probably forget they even asked 😉🤣 funny not funny


ebaldwin
3 months ago

@Novemmberrain

I was employed when I was diagnosed,I was very honest with them because I needed a lot of time off for test, MRIs and eye tests as I went blind in one eye.
When I applied for my job I have now I told them straight away in my interview that I had MS. I also told them my history on how I was diagnosed, they were extremely happy with my honesty and I’ve been there nearly a year now.Its been the best thing I’ve done in a long time. But I understand where you are coming from, I was extremely nervous to tick disabled because 1, I don’t feel like I am and 2, I didn’t want it to go against me. But it never has done 😊


novemberrain
3 months ago

Awesome 😁


strictlysoca
3 months ago

My view is if being disabled leads to discrimination and general BS before we even get to work for the company then it’s not somewhere I want to work as it’s stressful thinking “what if “ all the time. I have just had a very good experience changing jobs from a BS employer to a good one. It’s like another world when people understand the Equality Act rather than have a tick box on the form


novemberrain
3 months ago

Interesting to hear your views @strictlysoca. Interviewer: ‘Do you have any questions for us?” Me: “What do you understand about the EA?” I wouldn’t but it wake make them squirm would my it?


strictlysoca
3 months ago

Haha that would be a question and a half. I was thinking about one thing that might test the water though as it’s a good point, as I had inside Information on the employer.

May be something sneaky ” I notice from your website (hopefully they have some sort of lip service thing) that the company has a really positive attitude to disability just like my general attitude towards my disability- is there anything you would like to ask me? “. This would allow you to say that it’s no big deal etc and you can see what they are like. Sounds like others did well from the up,front strategy.


novemberrain
3 months ago

Thanks @strictly soca. Thats a great idea! I disclosed longstanding health condition on form and described my situation not affecting working at the end of the covering letter. The ball is in their court so to speak but that is a super way for them to learn. Try and enjoy your holiday 😉

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