Last reply 6 years ago
Do you think that the horrible headache has connection with MS?

Hello guys,

last week I could not eat normally and I had a bit headache. Then I started to throw every food or water out and my doctor told me, that I have some kind of stomach virus. I think ook, but the problems is – for 3days I am eating and drinking normally, but the headache just do not want to leave me…I have already taken 2tables against pain, but it does not work…Also, I think that somethimes I have problems with my eyes. I really do not know if it can have some connestion with MS, but I am afraid that yes. What do you think or does somebody have this experience too?

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pottypete
6 years ago

Headaches can definitely be a part of MS. I had severely debillitating ones when I started with it. I’m having some now with my relapse.
I hope yours clear up soon. xxx


Alison
6 years ago

I was told by a medical professional that headaches aren’t an MS symptom, but a quick google confirmed that some people DO have them so I wasn’t the only one! Snuggling up to a warm hot water bottle helped the pain a bit, and taking aspirin or ibuprofen was better than paracetamol, I guess because they’re anti-inflammatory. Also sleeping as much as possible. Hope you guys feel better soon X


crystal10
6 years ago

I think there headache have to be a symptom in some people. I have only had two periods in my life where headaches were ever a problem for me, otherwise they weren’t cause for concern. I remember having severe headaches for months as a young teenager, but never got checked out. More recently in February of this year I started having a headache that fluctuated in severity throughout the day, but was constant EVERYDAY until May when my neuro put me on a med that helped. I still get them but they aren’t as severe or constant. =/


shynini
6 years ago

Thank you for advices…I have already found out, why I had headache. It was just beginning of inflammation of the eye nerve. I should know it, because I had it twice, but I did not expect it. Do you know a good neurologist in Birmingham? Because I am not from here and in this situation I need to take kortikoids or any other treatment, which will fix it…! this always happens in the best time, really:D


lightningduck
6 years ago

@Alison – I suspect “MS symptoms” are “whatever I feel” and damn the ‘experts’


crystal10
6 years ago

that’s true @lightningduck , nobody knows our bodies and what’s normal or not normal but each of us individually


Anonymous
6 years ago

I agree with @lightningduck … unfortunately it would seem that the medical profession as a whole know very little about the facts in regards to MS symptoms. You are the best one to know if what you are feeling is “normal” as in having been experienced other times in your life as a result of a sinuses, dehydration, stress, eye strain etc or if it is one of those pains that are very MS’ish. I get bouts of headaches as well… use to be more constant and now they come and go but I can always tell when they are MS related now that I’ve had some history with them. Hope your head feels better soon.


Alison
6 years ago

@lightningduck Good point! It can’t be easy for medical professionals dealing with a condition that is so varied from person to person & changes through time. As a newly-diagnosed patient I expected my MS nurse to be a reliable source of information, but now I realise they don’t know everything!


lightningduck
6 years ago

I think the problem is that MS is one thing and that everything else is something else

MS is just the damage to the CNS, the lesions in the Myelin, the breakdown of the autoimmune system that causes the attacks upon yourself. We don’t really deal with that, it’s not painful, we can’t even feel it. We really can’t treat it; the medicines can help prevent the body from attacking itself or can help lesson inflammation once a new attack begins (steroids), but we can’t really treat the lesions, the damage, itself

EVERYTHING ELSE is the result of how the body’s mechanics get messed up when the CNS is damaged and really has very little to do with MS. Parestheisa? It’s not MS, it’s just the bad signaling that happens when CNS signals are interrupted. Legs don’t function? Eye sight problems? bladder problems? Fatigue? Headache? Same thing, those are really not MS. The MS did it’s damage before and now you are living with the results of a CNS that has frayed wiring, so to speak.

So really, an MS doctor has to be good in two different fields. 1) How does the autoimmune system attack the CNS and how do we slow, stop, or mitigate that 2) What are the thousands of ways the body can be effected in it’s behavior, sensations, and reactions when the CNS is damaged

Because really “How do you treat MS?” and “How do you treat bladder control brought on by nervous system damage?” are two completely separate issues. The first is relatively a simple idea…relatively. The second is, well it’s a whole host of specialties in the human body

It’s no wonder that often even medical professionals have a hard time getting a handle on it. It’s one disease, but it’s a thousand results

and the damage does not always occur in the same place, the same severity, or hit the same way, so every single MS patient is different in how their body responds to how the CNS is damaged


Anonymous
6 years ago

@lightningduck – I quite agree.

I’ve actually been suffering from chronic headaches since my pre-teens. We checked everything back then and didn’t find a cause. After my first relapse in 07…the headaches went from common (every couple of days) to truly chronic (meaning daily). Also the odd migraine pops up as well. Don’t know if its truly related to MS (or whatever I have) but it seems quite likely.

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