Anonymous 25/02/17
Last reply 11 months ago
Diet with a healthy lifestyle

Hello all,

I’ve had ms for years (rrms) and avoided any kind of forums until I found this one which doesn’t focus purely on the negatives of ms. From the very beginning of this incredible journey I have chosen to focus on my lifestyle, diet, exercise, being chemical free and lots of rest and relaxation, essentially looking after my MIND, BODY & SPIRIT. This is all possible even with a family (I know I’ve had a baby along the way). Anyway, I’m really interested to hear from anyone who uses diet and a holistic lifestyle. I’m following the Best Bet Diet (which 11 years ago was really one of the main ones), now there are all these:
Oms
Swank
Ms diet for women
Paleo diet
Terry Wahls protocol
Mediterainian diet
Have a missed any?

I have very little contact with the ms teams and I’ve stayed healthy along my journey.
Looking forward to some conversation x

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californiadreamin
11 months ago

My wife has MS and we are following OMS. she was diagnosed only last year but we are following pretty throughly.


Anonymous
11 months ago

That’s great @californiadreamin how is your wife getting on? Lots of vit d over there ☀️


californiadreamin
11 months ago

Well less Vit D then one would think… its pretty wet this year. She was diagnosed in Nov 2016 so it hasnt been too long. It was tough transisting to the diet at first, she loved cheese and dairy especially. We are also using Tecfidera so its not diet only and that medication had some getting used to on top of everything. Happy to share more, but so far so good.


scramblelina
11 months ago

Also been following OMS for nearly 4 years and had no relapses for 4.5 years now. It’s something I’m very passionate about and it disturbs me how many people don’t understand how important what you put into your body is and how it affects everything.


beccamc99
11 months ago

I was diagnosed in Oct 2015, initially I started to get really serious about diet and supplements but stress seemed to be the major factor for relapse after relapse before diagnosis. After diagnosis symptoms settled down a bit and I had Lemtrada a year ago. I fell off the wagon a bit when it comes to food and exercise. I’m not at all unhealthy but I’m desperate to make the change to OMS diet and more exercise but find it so hard to make the change last longer then a couple of weeks! I’ll start off enthusiastic then a few weeks later, I’ll have a bad week, I’ll be tired, maybe get a migraine and feel too lazy to make anything good! I think the key is probably in the planning…


lucyh
11 months ago

Yes, @beccamc99, that was a criticism of the OMS diet (I follow it too)….it was said to get amazing results because the people who follow it are already healthy enough to do so; so hard if you cannot stand/move etc. to cook healthy food (or any food). Still, it, and the Wahl’s Protocol etc, are great lifelines for us. I’m on a waiting list for a MBSR course to complete things from the mind/spirit side of things. Good luck with your journeys! (as I hurry to look up the best bet diet!)


simone2
11 months ago

I have been following the best bet diet since being diagnosed over 5 years ago, I am very careful what I eat due to being very allergy to food additives, I stopped taking DMDs 4 years ago due to the terrible side affects I had, also try to meditate every day and I find doing Taichi really helps me and exercise everyday.


Anonymous
11 months ago

Sorry I haven’t responded I couldn’t get into the site over the weekend. It’s lovely to hear other people are using diet, either stand alone or alongside drugs. We’re all so different and ms is different for everyone too.

@scramblelina I totally agree with the mind/gut connection and it is now scientifically proven. In needs our ‘experts’ to be on board too and I certainly haven’t found one yet! I’m glad it’s working for you.

@beccamc99 at least you’re aware of using diet. You’re body will be going through a slight detox at the beginning, and with any detox you will feel worse before you get better. Keep going, make sure you’ve got all the ingredients in your fridge/cupboards and @lucyh yes I guess it’s hard to cook if your struggling with mobility or fatigue. I’m luck enough to have time on my hands, but I do suffer from fatigue so I, 1) plan meals in advance 2) have all the ingredients 3) cook in batches or 4) have a smoothie and I’m still getting the key nutrients. What’s MBSR?

@simone2 I always think it must be hard coming off drugs once you’ve started. So it’s great to hear a success story. I try and meditate too, I find relaxation apps work well too. @beccamc99 these will really help your stress levels.

I’m passionate about healing the mind, body & spirit for many diseases or ailments, so please check out my fb closed group – https://www.facebook.com/groups/🙏🏼X


lucyh
11 months ago

Hi! MBSR is mindfulness-based stress reduction (course)….they are becoming very popular…you also have to commit to spending an hour every day meditating, course starting in May (if I’m deemed suitable), so let’s see 🙂


Anonymous
11 months ago

Excellent. I hope you get on it 😊


gracekasia
11 months ago

MS is very new to me, after having 1 severe attack (back in November 2016) doctors diagnosed me with RR MS (December) and wanted me to start on one of the stronger drugs right away, I am reluctant to do so. So, I have been changing my diet as well as using homeopathy, reflexology and cranial osteopathy. I came off my steroid treatment 3-4 weeks ago and now feeling very drained (as i believe my body is getting used to being off them, 5 months of treatment including a hospital stay, 5 days of IV steroids).

Diet-
I chose the Paleo Diet as I felt my symptoms increase dramatically any time I ate refined sugar and gluten, so this was an obvious way to go for me.
I’ve been following the Paleo Diet for the past 2-3 months, slowly getting more and more strict. I’ve actually been enjoying food more than ever, creating extremely tasty meals, baking etc. and it hasn’t been as difficult as I initially thought it would be. Although I’ve just been looking up the guide lines for the Autoimmune Protocol Diet which seems a bit extreme to me. Do you think it’s really worth taking an autoimmune diet to this strict extreme?

I’ve been feeling extremely positive about my illness and change of lifestyle. It’s been an eye opener seeing which friends stick by you, and amazing to get closer to the ones that do. I work in the film industry (as a model maker) and was lucky enough to be working on a film with a crew of people who looked after me a great deal even before I knew what was wrong. The recent drop in my physical and mental energy has made me a little worried but trying to keep positive and having a bit of a break from my busy work/life in London.


Anonymous
11 months ago

Hi @gracekasia thank you so much for joining my fb page, I’ve sent you a message, but obviously you’ve explained everything here.

I seem to remember I started on my diet excluding dairy, legumes and gluten fairly early on, but had the odd slice of bread or bit of cheese or chunk of milk chocolate which tasted great at the time, but left me feeling fatigued the next day. It will take time to work out what your body wants and needs. I need red meat occasionally and fish a lot! The autoimmune diet sounds a bit like GAPS I and yes they’re both extreme. If you think you need to reset your gut then go for it, if not introduce fermented foods like saukraat and bone broth into your diet. I can tell you more if you’d like.

Your positivity is great and you can never underestimate the power of positive thinking. I truly believe a lifestyle change has truly made a difference to my health and mental wellbeing and kept me safe and healthy all these years – may it continue. BUT I am also aware and not naive of what may happen, but my time in this world may end tomorrow crossing the road !


jofamof5
11 months ago

I am doing the Swank diet. I did some research on the different diets for MS patients and I found this diet would work best for me. My husband is trying this diet with me as well. We have a 15 yr old daughter who rather eat pizza rolls. It is hard to convert her. I am in the middle of a flare up right now it is hard for me to do any walking or exercise right now. I’m walking with a cane. I’m actually waiting for a confirmation and treatment plan from my neurologist. My appointment is in 2 weeks.


gracekasia
11 months ago

Ok, fermented food and bone broth sound like a good plan to me thank you!


wesdyne_otto
11 months ago

This is not something Canadian neurologists talk about, in fact, this is the first I’m hearing of it.
Currently transitioning from 12 years of RR to SP.
Recently, switched to a modified diabetic diet (no processed or modified food ingredients (modified milk, bleached flour, etc.) no processed or added sugars, >2g polyunsaturated and monosaturated fat/day, fish 2x’s week, which is a trick as we live on the prairies, complex carbohydrates, ground flax seed on and in everything – it’s my new sugar).
Shopping is a longer process due to label reading. In Canada, it seems like everything has polyunsaturated fats (vegetable, soy, corn, peanut oil) or glucose/fructose.
I have no appetite, so the eating has been relatively easy.
And I cheat sometimes because 7 yam fries are not going to be the death of me. The way I look at it, and this only applies to my life, I have MS, which is crap enough. If I want a single scoop of chocolate, hand-made ice cream with my berries once a week, I am not denying myself.
At the beginning of MS, I joined Weight Watchers and lost 35 lbs. through diet and exercise, which helped my mobility immensely.

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