Last reply 5 months ago
Virus bacterial infections & gut health

Hello everyone, I’ve been doing loads of educational research just to try work out what’s happening to me and possibly why. Years ago I had viral meningitis (about 28 years ago) and was really ill in hospital for 3 weeks but more recently under anaesthetic for an operation (which went wrong immediately and surgery was abandoned) due to the fact that the acid from my stomach filled my lungs and I ended up on a life support with asperation pneumonia and also had sepsis (that they didn’t tell me about). I’ve read a lot of research about how viruses and bacterial infections can be significant in ms. I was also extremely stressed with work at the time of my first major attack and have heard this can also be a massive trigger. Also my hubby has parkinsons and I attended a talk by a top neurologist at parkinsons UK recently who said research believes that parkinsons (as well as Ms) can start in the gut which reflected research I’d read about gut flora and the gut/brain connection. my hubby and I have had gut problems for years. Last year after years of omoprazole without success and worsening symptoms It was found that I had helicobator pylori and multiple ulcers but have also suffered 2 bad cases of campylobator in the past and just wondered if anyone else has experienced similar or read up on any medical research.

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stumbler
10 months ago

@mavisdavies , from what I’ve seen over the years, contracting MS now seems to be down to a combination of factors. These could be viral, environmental, gastric and even genetic.

It’s a bit of a medical mystery, that’s for sure.


mavisdavies
10 months ago

Hi @stumbler thanks for your reply and yes there does appear to be multitude of factors related to MS and I suppose other neurological disorders. From the end of September of this year until the beginning of November I appear to have had what may or may not habe been a relapse but it was definitely another episode where previous symptoms returned with one or two new symptoms that again started off gradual then intensified before tailing off leaving me again with the odd remaining slight symptoms that can come and go but now feel almost the norm.


stumbler
10 months ago

@mavisdavies , the cause of MS will remain a mystery until one of our learned professionals have that “Eureka” moment.

Relapses, or exacerbations, can be difficult to identify as our symptoms can get worse when we’re fighting a general infection, e.g. a UTI. This is referred to as a pseudo-exacerbation, as symptoms should return to our normal, once the infection is resolved.


mavisdavies
10 months ago

@stumbler thanks. I’ve not been unwell with any type of infection for such a long time which is most unusual, like way over a year possibly two. But that’s probably been a blessing with everything else that’s been going on.


cameron
7 months ago

i know that gut health is the ‘next big thing’. You’ll have read Michael Mosley on the subject and maybe seen his documentary where he deliberately poisons his gut then has a moving camera trace the passage of the bacteria through the digestive system? I try follow a gut-friendly diet in the knowledge that there are big discoveries coming about the connection to major illnesses.


mavisdavies
6 months ago

Thanks @cameron what sort of diet do. You follow please. You hear of so many it can be confusing.
Many thanks


cameron
6 months ago

I do low carb, PM me if you want details. It’s the easiest diet I’ve ever done and now I’ve lost the weight find it quite easy to incorporate the principles into post-diet normal life. x


mavisdavies
5 months ago

@cameron thanks for your reply sorry I’ve not been on here for a while. Yes please send me the details in a DM I’d be most grateful. X


john_barry
5 months ago

@mavisdavies I have noticed my gut health seems to influence my MS. In 2012 I had a bad uti and after a couple of weeks on antibiotics I wound up in hospital with ulcerative colitis and my MS seriously blew up. I spent a few uncomfortable months recolonizing my gut. I try to get sauerkraut, miso, yogurt, kefir and lots of different cheeses. I have also tried various otc probiotic capsules but I haven’t noticed any great effect. @cameron What other things do you have in your diet? I try to cut down on carbs but it’s hard when most comfort food is carb heavy. The real scourge of distancing/isolating is it leads to recreational eating!


kateb
5 months ago

Hi @mavisdavies. I am very interested in this. Infact I spent a week after my lumbarpuncture last December (where I had to stay flat on my back due to a migrane) listening to numerous lectures on You tube. Dr Terry whals (spelling?) is interesting on the subject, I have bought her cook book and @cameron is right, it is the next big thing. There are clinics now that will test your gut bacteria, but I don’t think it’s as simple just as taking a probiotic. I am looking for a good functional medicine clinic to go to after we get let out again, and will let you know how I get on


cameron
5 months ago

Hi @john_barry and @mavisdavies, I can answer both at once. The quickest route into this is two recipe books. I got mine at Tesco’s cheap but amazon has them. They are both by Michael Mosley’s wife, who is a practising GP. The first is The 8-week Blood Sugar Diet Recipe Book. This gives you the science of low-carb, how it can reverse type 2 diabetes, improve overall health and – if you follow the calorie guidelines – will give you an average of a 2 stone weight loss in 8 weeks. But you don’t need to do that to benefit from the approach and the recipes. Making the changes from high to low carb, which are NOT obvious changes and do need the recipes for, will in itself likely bring some weight loss and tick all the boxes for general health improvement. The recipes are all pretty easy, no-fuss. When you’ve got your head round the science and have got a dozen or so of these recipes under your belt, you’ll start feeling the benefit. At that point you can move to the second book, by the same author: The Clever Guts Diet Recipe Book. This builds on the low-carb idea by explaining how with some more tweaks you can change the gut bacteria and see even bigger gains. The approach in both books is not an extreme one – it’s not the full keto/atkins very high protein/fat idea. It’s easy to follow, though, because (for me, anyway) getting rid of white sugar etc is compensated by the highER fat and protein dishes e.g. full-fat Greek yoghurt, olive oil, nuts etc. and there’s lots of veggie ideas. I’m sure there are other authors, other titles that will give you the same basics but I have found this so straightforward I haven’t bothered to look. Just make sure you REALLY read the intro, because without understanding the science it all looks a bit odd! Let me know if I can help further. x


cameron
5 months ago

Should have said: author is Dr Clare Bailey. I see the published price for each is £14.99 but I paid half that.


john_barry
5 months ago

@cameron Thank you. I ordered The Clever Guts book.


Anonymous
5 months ago

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