Last reply 6 months ago
Relapses

I found all the relapses i was having for the first good few years after i was diagnosed with ms were due to my environment Living in central London. I moved to derbyshire 5 years ago, and i am not as stressed out as i was… hearing sirens every few mins really got to me. It was a living hell i craved peace and quiet. I get so much of it now and I’m only half a mile from the centre of town. Looking back it was a living hell for me personally and it would never have bothered me before i had ms. So grateful for this peace and quiet i have now. 🙏

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Anonymous
6 months ago

I moved to Derby cos my parents moved away from London due to my Mum having ms. They moved up many years ago. Took me a few years to get the London out of me but i am so glad i moved out now because of what i stated before.


Anonymous
6 months ago

Slower the better the better the fuel


Anonymous
6 months ago

‘What if?’ statements throw fuel on the fire of stress and worry. Things can go in a million different directions, and the more time you spend worrying about the possibilities, the less time you’ll spend focusing on taking action that will calm you down and keep your stress under control.


Anonymous
6 months ago

  People will notice the change in your attitude towards them, but won’t notice their behavior that made you change.


sfrox
6 months ago

Yeah, stress is definitely a factor although my esteemed neurologist said there is not a proven correlation. They should just ask patients 😉


Anonymous
6 months ago

@sfrox i had a sensation relapse due to stress my neurologist told me


Anonymous
6 months ago

@sfrox i had some bad news before midnight was crawling on the floor by 3am haven’t been able to walk undaided since that night. Nearly 3 years ago.


Anonymous
6 months ago

@sfrox they can’t prove numbness but know how it happens. It’s sensory my ms told me. Mri scan can’t prove numbness.


Anonymous
6 months ago

@sfrox *ms specialist nurse


Anonymous
6 months ago

@sfrox sensitivity
/sɛnsɪˈtɪvɪti/
Learn to pronounce
noun
noun: sensitivity
the quality or condition of being sensitive.
“a total lack of common decency and sensitivity”
synonyms: responsiveness, sensitiveness, reactivity; susceptibility, vulnerability; rarereactiveness, susceptivity, susceptibleness
“many commonly prescribed drugs increase the sensitivity of the skin to ultraviolet light”
consideration, care, thoughtfulness, tact, diplomacy, delicacy, subtlety, finesse, finer feelings;
understanding, empathy, awareness of the feelings of others, soft skills, sensibility, feeling, intuition, intuitiveness, responsiveness, receptivity, receptiveness;
perceptiveness, perception, discernment, insight;
savoir faire
“introducing change calls for patience and sensitivity”
touchiness, oversensitivity, hypersensitivity, thin skin, defensiveness;
informaltwitchiness
“Shiona’s sensitivity on the subject of boyfriends”
delicacy, trickiness, awkwardness, difficulty, ticklishness
“the sensitivity of the issue”
antonyms: imperviousness, insensitivity
feelings liable to be offended or hurt; sensibilities.
plural noun: sensitivities
“the only rules that matter are practical ones that respect local sensitivities”


Anonymous
6 months ago

sensory
/ˈsɛns(ə)ri/
Learn to pronounce
adjective
adjective: sensory
relating to sensation or the physical senses; transmitted or perceived by the senses.
“sensory input”
Origin

mid 18th century: from Latin sens- ‘perceived’ (from the verb sentire ) or from the noun sense + -ory2.


Anonymous
6 months ago

Sensory processing
DescriptionSensory processing is the process that organizes sensation from one’s own body and the environment, thus making it possible to use the body effectively within the environment. Wikipedia


Anonymous
6 months ago

Sensory processing sensitivity is a temperamental or personality trait involving “an increased sensitivity of the central nervous system and a deeper cognitive processing of physical, social and emotional stimuli”. Wikipedia


Anonymous
6 months ago

stimulus
/ˈstɪmjʊləs/
Learn to pronounce
noun
plural noun: stimuli
a thing or event that evokes a specific functional reaction in an organ or tissue.
“areas of the brain which respond to auditory stimuli”
a thing that arouses activity or energy in someone or something; a spur or incentive.
“if the tax were abolished, it would act as a stimulus to exports”
synonyms: spur, stimulant, encouragement, impetus, boost, prompt, prod, incentive, inducement, inspiration, fillip; motive, motivation, impulse; provocation, goad, incitement; informal shot in the arm, kick up the backside; technical precipitant
“cheap energy provided a major stimulus to economic development in western Europe”
antonyms: deterrent, discouragement
an interesting and exciting quality.
“she loved the stimulus of the job”
Origin

late 17th century: from Latin, ‘goad, spur, incentive’.


Anonymous
6 months ago

Plural stimuli (stĭm′yə-lī′) Physiology Something that can elicit or evoke a physiological response in a cell, a tissue, or an organism. A stimulus can be internal or external. Sense organs, such as the ear, and sensory receptors, such as those in the skin, are sensitive to external stimuli such as sound and touch.
Stimuli | Definition of Stimuli at Dictionary.com

No proven correlation?


Anonymous
6 months ago

We all experience the world through our senses. How we translate sensory information into actions is called sensory processing.


Anonymous
6 months ago

Sensory processing refers to the way the nervous system receives messages from the senses and turns them into responses. For those with Sensory Processing Disorder, sensory information goes into the brain but does not get organized into appropriate responses.

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