kanjalina 01/02/15
Last reply 3 years ago
Walking, balance, blah, blah, blah :-)

Hi everyone,

I am new to this site, not quite sure why it has taken me so long to join?!…..

I have relapsing remitting and was diagnosed approx. 16 years ago when I was 17 years old.
Like most people I’m sure, I have tried a number of DMD’s, none of which were suitable…
I have been relatively lucky to date with symptoms, optical neuritis has always been a permanent symptom since being diagnosed.

Recently, I have been experiencing problems with my walking and have become more ‘clumsy’, also poor balance. I tried going to the gym to try using the cross trainer, or simply walking, unfortunately my legs were not strong enough so stopped.

As I have absolutely zero patience and refuse to give up, I signed up for hot yoga classes to help strengthen my core muscles and help with my balance.

I was wondering if anyone else has tried this or has any advice on what can help with mobility issues?

Thanks in advance 🙂

Nat

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stumbler
3 years ago

hi @kanjalina , and welcome.

So, a couple of issues, fatigue and balance.

Fatigue seems to be the bane of our lives. The problem, and management of the problem, is well discussed in the “Spoons” theory (http://www.butyoudontlooksick.com/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory/). But, physical fatigue, e.g. the legs becoming tired, is down to the damage to the neural pathways between our lower body and our brain. If the brain is not receiving the correct feedback from our nerve endings, then the brain cannot give the correct response. Hence, our brain dictates that our legs are tired when we know they should not be tired.

Now, don’t let that issue detract you from your yoga class. Yoga is a great way to stretch the muscles and retain some suppleness. Just be aware of your “spoons” (see above) and try not to overheat, which can bring on fatigue.

As for balance, yes, we do have to concentrate and be careful. Our balance is controlled by three mechanisms. The balance mechanism from our ears, visual feedback and physical feedback from our lower limbs.

If any of these mechanisms is not providing correct feedback, then our balance suffers. In your case, your Optical Neuritis (ON) is probably affecting your visual feedback.

Never lose that attitude of refusing to give up. Just factor in the MS into your stoical decisions. 😉


caterpillar
3 years ago

As usual, a very wise response from @stumbler 🙂 above.

I am new to yoga, but it seems to “tick all the boxes” as a perferct training for MSers : it has an element of strength training using the weight of your own body, it challenges balance, it stretches every muscle and helps to focus your mind :-).

But did you say hot yoga? ( that is yoga in a room with raised temperature?). Avoid avoid avoid ( unless you are an exceptional MSer with no heat sensitivity, most people with MS feel weaker as the core temperature rises). If I overdo it at the gym and overheat, I rapidly turn into a rag doll.

If you have balance issues then maybe try some yoga class for people with balance issues first? Or try some yoga at home ( plenty of yoga videos on youtube and msn.com, for example)

Never give up! 🙂


cameron
3 years ago

I prefer Pilates to yoga (after trying both) for the simple reason that Pilates works so well with physiotherapy. I’ve seen a physio regularly since being diagnosed, as I had fixed disability from day one. My neuro physio has worked on the muscle groups affecting my mobility and Pilates really carries this on. In fact, some of the exercises are the same. But even if you don’t have physio back-up, Pilates will work specifically on your core muscles. This improves balance generally and should reduce falls. The MS nurse (who used to be a continence adviser) has told me that Pilates is the very best thing to improve bladder function, because every Pilates exercise strengthens the pelvic floor. Pilates apart, I would say your best bet is to get a thorough check-over by a neuro physio. This will pinpoint the issues by assessing muscle groups and seeing exactly where the demyelination has occurred. Once you know this, any exercise programme is more effective.


kanjalina
3 years ago

Wow! Thank you all so much for the feedback xx

Surprisingly, I am finding the heat manageable with no bouts of bad fatigue afterwards, perhaps due to the volume of water I drink during the class….

Have a great day everyone ☺

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