mrvelocity 15/12/14
Last reply 3 years ago
Tendinitis in Leg/Hip

I saw my Doctor and my MS nurse about a very painful hip. I was told it’s not my MS but I would argue otherwise! I have symptoms of tendinitis down the outside of my thigh and inner groin but when I walk it feels like a trapped nerve in my hip socket.

Pain killer sort of help until I catch it and I’m hit with a painful sharp pain in my hip.

I was wondering if anyone else has had anything similar and managed to recover and what you did that helped.

I’ve tried phisio exercises but if I try and walk, I still have the same sharp pain if I catch it. I’ve had anti emflametry scream to try and help but that does nothing. When I saw the phisio, if I lent over I would feel the pain coming on. Rest helps with the constant pain but when I get moving again it’s worse than when I stopped to rest.

I’m at my whits end on working out the best way to deal with this as I can’t just rest as I have a 2 1/2 week old I need to help out with and 3 other kids to sort out with my partner who is still recovering herself.

I need help!

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stumbler
3 years ago

I would be inclined to agree with you , @mrvelocity . MS causes weakness in certain limbs/areas of the body and we naturally compensate. By compensating, we can introduce very bad practices, which can lead to the type of problems that you may be experiencing.

Now, you mention a physio. Is this a general Physio or a Neuro-physio? The latter is more specialised in looking at the situation holistically and should be able to locate what’s not working and is causing the problem.

Just out of interest, which hospital are you under where you are?

And, congratulations to you and your partner on your new addition.


cameron
3 years ago

I’ve had similar, parallel problems, caused by poor (MS-affected) gait which became acute when I had a fall. I know what you mean – it FEELS like the MS and in my case it certainly made my whole body feel generally under strain. I pestered the GP for X-rays, which came back inconclusive but got me on prescription painkillers and anti-inflammatories. Six months on it was no better, I was getting less mobile and the pain had travelled to the thigh. When I ‘caught’ it, as you describe, I nearly passed out with the pain. I pestered a second time and got a referral to an orthopaedic surgeon. He MRIed it and found that a tiny piece of one of the lumbar vertebrae was pressing on a nerve. His first idea was an injection into the hip joint. He told me it would either sort it completely or do nothing. It did nothing. The solution was a discectomy – a removal of the protruding bit of the vertebra. Few days in hospital and it was sorted. It didn’t remove the back pain, but I later discovered that this had been due to a vitamin D deficiency. Once I was on 5,000iu daily supplementation, the back healed and I’ve had no trouble since. I think you have to pester to get anywhere. Might be a good idea to get a physio to really nail down what’s going on, then relay this to your GP and say you want a consultant referral. Good luck xx


mrvelocity
3 years ago

Thank you @stumbler.

The phisio is a general phisio under my local GP so it’s not a nurophysio. I will have to find my paperwork from my last nurophysio as she left contact details last time.

The phyisio did say it was probably where I was over compensating for the pain, that it’s not helping my tendinitis.

I can’t really do anything until after Christmas now so it looks like I’m in for a rough couple of weeks still at least and I’m going to try and go back to work next week but I don’t think I’m going to make it through a normal shift so I might ask my GP to get a return to work plan.


tabbycat
3 years ago

Hi, I think this does sound like something caused by over compensating in some way for a weakness in one leg. I ended up on a long walk without my sticks last year and had pain for MONTHS in my hip until my ms physio have me a series of very painful massages and then told me I must keep moving to get the pain out of the muscle. This may not work for you of course but once I was told that walking was not making it worse, it was amazing how I managed to cope with the pain and how quickly I recovered. Hope you are soon feeling a bit better.


mrvelocity
3 years ago

Yeah walking helps if I have taken sting painkillers first. I can’t lift my leg onto the bed at night, I have to hoist it on sometimes. Basically it’s turning on my leg, fast movement when I’m trying to avoid kids toys and lifting or moving it out sideways.


tabbycat
3 years ago

That sounds bad – keep badgering the physio and I hope they work something out soon.


jdd0310
3 years ago

I have something sort of similar, I get discomfort (not real pain) when I sit in my right buttock. Apparently it is nothing to do with my MS but I am sure it was the root cause one way or another. It seems to be. A tendon problem, I had a cortisone injection which helped a bit for a day or two but now I’m back to normal I’m waiting for a follow up at the moment, so fingers crossed that something will come out of it.


mrvelocity
3 years ago

Well, it’s been 5 weeks almost now and although walking is getting easier, I’m still in discomfort and occasional sharp pain when I catch it. I notice yesterday that I can’t lift my leg up more than 20cm off the floor before the chronic pain starts to set in fast.

I’m attempting to go back to work on Monday as I can’t afford the absence record I’m building up by being off work. I can walk with little impact on my problem I have apart from lifting my leg to high.

Am I being stupid, returning to work before I’m fully healed or should I take more time until I’m fully healed which could be a while still. I have a bad history with my employer with taking time off work for my MS and my general health so I push myself back to work sometimes before I’m truly ready. I don’t want to loose my job over this because it’s not a relapse and I won’t be protected by DDA or similar.

Or do I really need to talk to my Union & Ocupational Health on this matter because I have been into my place of work over the past two weeks so it will look bad if I take more time off, especially over Christmas & New Years.


stumbler
3 years ago

@mrvelocity , employers examine the staff sickness records to find occurrences of casual sickness, i.e. those employees that take many days here and there.

You are not one of those employees as you have a genuine condition that you are trying to manage.

Now, we go to our GP to get signed off from work. Now, dependant on the condition/circumstances, GPs should sign you back onto work. So, you should seek the proper medical advice before making rash decisions.

It would be better to return to work when you have recovered, rather than go back and risk a further relapse and another period of sick leave.

You are not a person taking sick leave casually. You have a confirmed debilitating neurological condition. Your employers have to take that into consideration.


cameron
3 years ago

@jdd0310 This is just a thought but when I recently had sharp pain in one buttock which then started to travel to my thigh, the physio told me to buy a small hard ball (ideally smaller than a tennis ball but as hard) and sit on it, rolling it around on the sore place. I was sceptical but it worked!


mrvelocity
3 years ago

Well I ended up going back to work, even though I wasn’t fully healed and so far so good, it seems to be settling down slowly.

I have a return to work meeting and was given a verbal warning for it.

Trouble is, it was issued under the fact that it was me who caused the injury by doing to much and causing the problem.

I’m considering appealing as at the time, my store was suffering low staff levels and to the point that one member tried to quit and was talked out of it.

My employer is ridiculous when it comes to my absents as it is and I get warnings for having time off with my MS.


stumbler
3 years ago

@mrvelocity , are you a member of a Union that you could talk to about this situation. It shouldn’t be an unknown situation for the Union.

Your employers should not be putting you under any kind of pressure because of this genuine situation.

Your employers are really laying themselves open to contravening the 2010 Equalities Act. Their responsibility is to make “reasonable adjustments” to allow you to continue working! Cracking the proverbial whip is a definite contravention.

Do get yourself acquainted with the facts about working with MS and the protection afforded to you by the law This publication may be useful :- http://www.mstrust.org.uk/shop/product.jsp?prodid=246

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