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stumbler
4 years ago

This might answer your question:-

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2440583/

😉


aussiekylie
4 years ago

Geeeez there’s some statistics @stumbler. Do you know what the difference between “baseline” lesions and I guess normal lesions are? (if there’s such a thing as a normal brain lesion haha). Also I’m curious as to why lumbar puncture wasn’t used in addition to brain MRI in these studies? Does anyone have information on this?


stumbler
4 years ago

@aussiekylie , from my understanding, a baseline is just a starting position, from which you can then monitor progress of lesion development. This allows for measurements to be taken for comparison.

A lumber puncture wouldn’t really add anything to this measurement, as this test is just to check for the presence of oligoclonal bands to confirm a diagnosis of MS.

I hope this helps…. 😉


aussiekylie
4 years ago

Thanks @stumbler. So can I just pick at your fountain of knowledge a bit more? My lumbar puncture showed oligoclonal bands and when I asked my neuro if anything else couldve caused them he said no. But when I’ve googled it (I know,dangerous consulting Dr Google) it said there are other causes, but it was quite complicated and referred to blood tests as well. All my blood tests were done prior to lumbar puncture and blood tests were all clear of anything that can cause optic neuritis.
So I guess I’m confused as to why neuro said nothing else causes oligoclonal bands? Maybe he was just simplifying it for me as he’s done all the other tests to rule out other causes? I do have faith in him and I realise this is a very complicated thing to explain to a patient.


stumbler
4 years ago

@aussiekylie , according to that great knowledgebase, wikipedia (I know, we shouldn’t), there are a few conditions that can cause the oligoclonal bands in your cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). They all seem to be neurological (I think, I’m not medical!)

However, our Neuros are trying to piece together a jigsaw to reveal our medical condition. So, the results of a lumber puncture are usually one of the final parts of our jigsaw, i.e. it needs to be consistent with other tests.

Does that help?


graham100
4 years ago

Sorry to put downer on this but optic nuritice was my 1st thing 4yrs ago and was told it would probably be no worse,, 2yrs later tingly fingers arm right side an heavy leg. Dx ms. Now can’t work. Or walk without crutches. But my lower back is really stiff seeing osteopath so it might not all be ms, we just seem to put everything down to ms, even the GP’s do though,, it’s just a wait and see game. No rim or reason. Good luck


sarahbee
4 years ago

Hello @weybey

I am not sure if the abstract shared by @stumbler which demonstrated that between 50 – 72% of people who initially presented with optic neuritis went onto be diagnosed with MS would have answered your question on people who present first with optic neuritis then having a ‘milder form of MS’.

I was diagnosed 14 years ago, having first presented with optic neuritis. Over the years, I can anecdotally report that I have consistently been told by medical professionals that people who present first with ON, show slower progression in the long term. However, I haven’t found the research to back this up. Does anyone else have the data?


Anonymous
4 years ago

I was diagnosed 25yrs ago as benign due to optic neuritis! I went 15 years before being relapsing. and have only just gone secondary progressive! Its different for everyone!! Just stay positive!

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