motorsportpete 05/04/15
Last reply 3 years ago
Job search

After I found out in going to be made redundant soon I decide to update my CV I’m unsure if I should include the fact I have MS as I don’t want employers to read I have MS as I think it might put them off I would prefer to tell them at the interview stage face to face but is it better they know first

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stumbler
3 years ago

@motorsportpete , that’s a tough question!

According to our laws, an employer is not allowed to discriminate. But, in reality, the choice between a healthy person and one who may need to go off sick is no real contest.

If you show no visible signs of MS, then I would be tempted to ignore the fact. If you are successful in the job application, then let them know once you have successfully completed the first three months. You’ve then proved that you can do the job and didn’t want any false interpretations when you applied. 😉


motorsportpete
3 years ago

Yeah it’s a tough question but I like your idea it proves to them I can do the job I just don’t want people to think that because I have MS I can’t do anything and will be off sick all the time


stumbler
3 years ago

@motorsportpete , well, don’t lie, just don’t tell the whole truth. 😉


the-pond
3 years ago

Hi

Personally, I’d be tempted to not mention it. However, there’s another approach you could take, which is to make it a strength. For example, having MS means you have to problem solve things more, like how to do something that you’re no longer physically able to. Or you’ve had to embrace change & learn lots, things like that.

That will probably be more relevant if the MS has affected you a lot rather than only being very mild. But it’s something to consider anyway.

Dan


mybrainhurts
3 years ago

Hello,

By law you don’t have to say or write anything. Out of experience (I’ve been a hiring manager for 10+ years), I’d do the following if I were you.
I wouldn’t mention anything on my CV, but at interview time you can easily turn this into a massive strength, as Dan suggested above. Most likely you’ll be asked something generic such as “Tell me about a situation where you were facing XYZ challenge and how you went about it?”.
You could respond along the lines of “I had to face XYZ when working for Blah Ltd. and after prioritising and addressing the most pressing issues first, we did this and that and reassessed the situation every single step along the way. On top of this I had to attend several medical appointments at the time, but was able to manage around this by making up the time in the evenings. My employer at the time realised that I’m extremely flexible when required, so I’m not shy to say that I’ve never failed to deliver when the pressure was on.”
Most important NEVER, EVER lie in an interview, because it will bite you in the back and a good interviewer will sense it straight away! Not telling the whole story (unless asked to do so) is not lying though 🙂
Depending on how the conversation goes and how comfortable you feel you could say “Oh and by the way, not that it’s important, but the medical condition that I had mentioned is MS. It’s not a big deal, but I think it’s only fair to let a potential future employer know that I’ve to attend medical check-ups every now and then. As I said before, I’m very flexible when it comes to these things.”
Bonus top-tip (not MS related), if you feel good at the end of the interview and if you really would like to get the job, then tell them so!
You wouldn’t believe how many interviews I’ve attended where I was left wondering “Does he or she actually want that job? They didn’t seem overly excited about it at all…”. You could say “Thank you very much for your time and for inviting me to an interview, this felt a lot more like a pleasant chat than a standard interview situation. And just in case I haven’t given you the impression already, I’m convinced that I would be an excellent fit for the role and I’m very keen to join your team!”.

Good luck 🙂


motorsportpete
3 years ago

Hi
That’s a great idea making ms positive I will use that
Thanks


motorsportpete
3 years ago

Hi
Yeah I think it’s best to only say about ms at the interview stage and try and make it positive thanks for great advice


caterpillar
3 years ago

Based on my experience : never mention it unless you are applying for a job at MS Trust or MS Society :-). I totally agree with @stumbler here. Given the choice between an MSer and a healthy person, employers will probably always go for the the person without MS.
And good luck with your job application! 🙂


northernlass
3 years ago

Ooo @mybrainhurts you make me feel like I want to go for job interview now… I’d feel very positive about how I should word things… 🙂 Sadly I already have a “full-time, all the time job” as a carer for my Autistic son.. but I just love the positivity. And @motorsportpete best of luck with any future interviews you may have. Let us know how you get on 🙂


motorsportpete
3 years ago

Thanks I hope I get a job

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