gates1989 05/03/17
Last reply 1 year ago
Has physio helped anyone?

Hi guys, so my main issues are balance and leg strength… I have been off my feet for a while so totally understand and expect it, but I want to do something to fix it! So I’ve booked a session with a neuro physio therapist. Has anyone had any experience with a neuro physio? And did it help?
Thanks x

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doubleo7hud
1 year ago

I’m waiting on physio appointments to come through at the mo. Iv been told swimming is really good for you (I can’t swim tho like a lead fish in water) core strength is important too apparently this helps build them up???? My legs are like jelly still balance seems to be worse if I don’t get a good nights sleep just plodding on tho till post lands.


red-suzuki
1 year ago

Well @gates1989, Have been with Neuro physio on & off for a few years now…1 to 1’s & group sessions….they are & were ( finished last Tuesday) amazing folk….they couldn’t tell me what other folk had because of confidentiality regs, but talking to the folk myself, most had MS with balance & leg strength issues….yes they knew how to get each individual, harder for some & all different, & work to the individuals abilities & needs….one lady came in with a 4 wheeled wheeler thing & they worked on her legs & the exercises to get her hips, legs & feet to work how they should do first ( all lined up in right direction, bad habits type thing) & the last group few 1 to 1 & group sessions with the help of the parallel bars for assistance next to her she walked the full length occasionally grabbing the bar one side, with the physio for support on the other side, until she walked up & down unaided, wobbly, but unaided….(please be aware this was over a series of hospital sessions of over many weeks)…….though was brilliant to watch……..so all I can say is if you can, please give it a try, as it may work for you too………all best with session. Red Suzuki


red-suzuki
1 year ago

…and as for me @gates1989, worked on balance, standing, walking & core strength exercises, which some I can now do at home (tailored to the individuals needs)….did it help???….have got to ask, without them would I be worse off………..answer………definitely.


stumbler
1 year ago

@gates1989 , a good Neuro-physio is worth their weight in gold.

They can identify the major problems, e.g. which muscles aren’t working properly, and prescribe simple exercises to address any weakness.

They’re good teachers, but they need you to do your “homework”, if you get what I mean.


cameron
1 year ago

In my book, neuro (and non-neuro) physios are THE KEY to managing MS. Together with being on a DMT and living as healthily as is physically possible, having physio enables you to know your body, minimise the MS damage and fully exploit your unaffected limbs. They work on the principle that the brain is capable of making new pathways They can help you to a) preserve and b) regain function through exercises which require the brain to find alternative routes to send messages to the nerves. It’s the principle which is used with stroke patients – not a quick fix, but does produce improvement in function if you’re prepared to keep going with the exercises. I include non-neuro physios because it’s also possible to develop musculo-skeletal problems which have arisen because of MS but are not neurological e.g. falls, sprains. If these MS ‘consequences’ are not dealt with promptly they may increase your overall level of disability. Early on with my MS, I was dramatically improved by a neuro physio who managed to sort my sticking-out hip , thereby reducing my limp. At that point I saw the need for keeping physio contact and decided to make it a financial priority. I’m still walking but I’m not sure if I still would be without the help I’ve had over the years. PS I was told that all physios do initial training in the full range but then specialise either in orthopaedic/sports injuries or in neuro. I was lucky enough to find one initially who was super-competent in both areas but I see her only occasionally now (as she lives 100 miles away!) , basically when I think there’s an MS issue. I do ‘regular’ physio in a hydrotherapy pool with an orthopaedic physio. Both are very good. You may have search around to get exactly what you need.


potter
1 year ago

I was sent to a physical therapist when I was first diagnosed to help with leg cramps. She gave me a list of stretches to do and they worked. I have been doing them for nine years three or four times a week. I had a aunt who had MS that used a walker after seeing a physical therapist she was able to walk with a cane again. She was in her 70’s and had foot drop for 30 years. Potter


shazzyp
1 year ago

I attended a neuro gym and would say it has definitely helped my balance. The exercises are ongoing, even tho I have been signed off, but are so worth it. I have also joined a pilates class for core strength and go swimming weekly. Good luck, you should see an improvement.


gates1989
1 year ago

Thanks everyone for you’re comments… think I’ve definitely made the right choice after hearing about your experiences! She’s coming to see me tomorrow as I’m
Not at work tomorrow, I’m a bit excited now! I also have my PIP assessment tomorrow, not expecting to get it but you never know, I might get a human being lol xx


cameron
1 year ago

Just to say that at the end of the session you should expect him/her to have tested the strength of each of your limbs and any weakness identified – both the area and the extent of the weakness. Importantly, you should know in detail what’s going on with each of your limbs (hopefully, nothing!) I know my neuro physio was able (through pressing and prodding!) to say exactly where in my leg and foot the demyelination had occurred. I found that really helpful and actually it wasn’t where I thought it was, which explained why my own made-up exercises hadn’t worked. The physio may get you doing exercises which ‘compare’ each side of your body to each other – this is so you are (i.e. your brain is) constantly reminded of how the normal, unaffected limbs work and thereby encourage the damaged ones to imitate them. He/she will also test the strength of your core muscles (i.e. those round your middle) – really, really important because a strong core helps you compensate for weakness elsewhere in the body and helps prevent falls. It’s clever stuff. Ask lots of questions.


tracyd
1 year ago

@gates1989 yup I did this through my local MS Therapy Centre where I was given a full assessment of my mobility and balance (mobilty was fine but balance was very poor) I was given both balance and strength excercises which helped a lot along with regular monitoring of progress


gates1989
1 year ago

Yes I will ask lots of questions, I’m looking forward to finding out what is going on and how I can fix it! Thank you all xx

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