Last reply 1 year ago
foot drop splint

So, I finally saw a neuro physio who recommended using a foot splint, as my walking issues would be mainly due to swinging the leg on the outside to avoid tripping on my foot. She got a very valid point of course.

I am in 2 minds about this. I did use it today, and there are some huge benefits, like not having to think about every single step, it seems to make a big difference to my fatigue and brain space, and I was able to admire the blue sky for the 1st time in a long time.

I am however scared to lose the little bit of control I have left over my foot. If I stop moving it, wouldn’t the muscles in there go completely to waste to the point of no return? I still have hope that, after Lemtrada and with a bit of time and good diet, the nerves will repair to some extend.

Anyone else wearing a splint? what do you think?

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barnwell
1 year ago

Ditto to everything you have just written. I’ve had both rounds of lemtrada and my nurse said try a neuro physio too and she recommended a foot splint too, which I use about half the time, and I don’t want to rely on it either. She also gave me some core exercises to do which are kind of helping. Sorry I couldn’t have been more helpful but it’s only been two weeks. Time will tell I suppose, and what will be is my attitude 👍🤞😏


stumbler
1 year ago

@noelie , the splint is made of nylon and is fairly rigid, but does have a bit of give.

As you’ve already witnessed, this does resolve the primary issue, but it does also train the foot and related muscles to work too.


barnwell
1 year ago

Sorry mine is not a splint. It’s a thing that velcros around the top of my ankle and attach a band onto the lace holes of my footwear.

* reading that back, I hope it kind of makes sense


noelie
1 year ago

@stumbler @barnwell
Thanks for that, mine is the Velcro type as well, I was given the 2 options (probably as a way to make me agree to wear something as I was reluctant haha, that old trick).

I’m planning on wearing it part time too, especially when I walk to try and increase the distance I can cover. It’s only been one day, so no miracle there but a more confident walk and a bit faster. She also gave me a program for my hand and leg.

How do you find going down the stairs with it? I find it a bit tricky and go sideways.

Enjoy the long weekend


bonang1975
1 year ago

Im havin some preety bad drop foot at the moment. So the splints work good? Cause im getting pretty sick of falling over. Im hoping the lemtrada does the same for me to. Well all of us for that matter.


noelie
1 year ago

@bonang1975 it’s worth looking into it. My leg felt much lighter with it. Good luck and i hope lemtrada works for you.


stumbler
1 year ago

@noelie , going downstairs needs extreme caution as the splint restricts the natural footdrop for descending stairs.

Getting into cars can be a nightmare with the splint(s) on. 😉


noelie
1 year ago

@stumbler thanks, that makes perfect sense, they had forgotten to warn me and being on the 3rd floor without lift, I got a bit of a shock 😀


highheeledfagin
1 year ago

I use my velcro foot-up – also called a splint just to confuse us – on my better days when the crutch isn’t needed. Your muscles will be fine if you do exercises, and I imagine that you don’t wear it around the house. My problem with it is that it tends to slip down my leg after not very long, so it’s pretty much just for short trips. The FES was definitely a huge improvement, and still my favourite, but relapses have meant that I just wasn’t using it often enough to justify keeping it.


noelie
1 year ago

@highheeledfagin thanks, you’re right, i don’t wear it in the flat and i exercise so fingers crossed it will be all benefits. Still getting to grip with putting in on right. Next step is trying the FES too.


hank
1 year ago

hi , for what its worth i have been wearing a rigid splint for last 3 years , and am very happy with it, it stops so many falls and makes it easier to get into car, you just grab hold of splint and lift leg into car. i wear it full time and dont notice any weakness of muscles in my leg. but inany case when i take it off at night i stand holding onto a support and raise myself up onto my toes 10-15 times, this also helps prevent muscle spasms at night. i tried the electric impulse to lift foot but just couldnt get away with it, it was a problem fitting it every day where as the rigid splint is very easy


cameron
1 year ago

My splint is different in that it has a spring in it, so that you can go up and down steps. It’s made of carbon steel so is weightless, it sorts the foot drop and encourages the knee to bend without hyperextension. It’s a fairly new invention and not all orthotists or physios know about it. Got mine on NHS, happy to share details. PS re: losing muscle ablity, my physio told me that with any walking aid, there is a ‘cost’. In other words, you sort out one problem but another (hopefully less severe) will be created. This is the case with an ankle orthotic, because the body is no longer required to use that set of muscles to get the desired movement. However, the greater good is your increased overall mobility.


noelie
1 year ago

@highheeledfagin yes problem of it sliding down the leg, it’s limiting me to wearing only my hi top trainers to keep it up, not ideal with summer finally here but hey 🙂

@hanks thank you, it is reassuring.

i was very sceptical at first, but i have to say that so far, it’s been a good experience. It’s like another layer of brain fog has been lifted, i hadn’t realised it was brought on by the effort i was wasting on my foot! or is it just a coincidence.

@cameron up and down the stairs, that sounds good, i went down 3 floors backward this morning while juggling a 2 year old and her scooter, that was fun but can you share the details so i can look it up?


cameron
1 year ago

Look up Fillauer Dynamic Walk. I have the double spring model but depending on your foot/leg strength and degree of foot drop, you might get away with the single-sided model. It’s very comfortable to wear because the back of the shin is cushioned and the leg as a whole feels strengthened. BUT, as I say, it’s fairly new and it was a very up-to-speed neuro physio who made me aware of it. At the NHS orthotic clinic at my hospital, they knew nothing about it and tried to fob me off with a fixed plastic AFO so you may have to argue the toss. When I looked last, the full price was c. £300 so it’s not a ridiculous amount (IMO) for the NHS to be paying! Honestly, it has doubled/trebled my walking ability. xx


noelie
1 year ago

@cameron thank you so much for that, it looks amazing. I’ll definitely mentioned it at my next physio appointment. I might be able to go back to gentle spinning if i had something like that, dream dream dream…xx


cameron
1 year ago

@noelie, check out Fillauer DW on YouTube and you’ll see how gait is altered and how it works on uneven surfaces. x

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