Last reply 1 month ago
Distraction ideas

OK, so please tip and tricks.

Progressive dx, so does anyone have any ideas to quosh the most debilitating of my symptoms.. Not walking, not vision, not messed up bladder etc (albeit those issues are getting to me) the biggest issue I have in simply getting it out of my head. Meditating simply ain’t cutting it

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dannibrett
1 month ago

Hi @renegade,

I’m fairly new to the whole process too but how long since you were diagnosed? It sounds corny, but time has been the most important factor in accepting it, and therefore filling my time so that I think about it less.

When i’m having a relapse, it does fill my head and talking about that with friends and family help but when I’m well I try and “make up for lost time”; seeing friends, being more active with the kids and generally trying to ignore it, as much as is possible.

Meditation doesn’t do it for me either, but what else do you enjoy?


stumbler
1 month ago

@renegade , how long have you been diagnosed? I didn’t want to assume that you were having trouble with acceptance, until I was aware that you were recently diagnosed or not.

Discuss this issue with your MS Nurse. They might suggest some counselling or Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)…….


renegade
1 month ago

Recently, to be fair… I can accept, or at least feel like I have, progressive feels a little raw but OK. I am just struggling a little bit getting it out of my head. A response is very much appreciated tho guys. Thank you for that


grandma
1 month ago

Time us about the only healer that will do any good. You have benn dxd with what used to be a life sentence, that is no longer the case but it all takes time. Give yourself a year, then look back to how you were. Don’t make any sudden changes to big things, I.e. house,job, child care, etc., take each day as it comes, learn what you body likes and dislikes, make small changes to accomodate them, don’t stress, that’s a killer with ms and chill out😍


stumbler
1 month ago

@renegade , the period following diagnosis is an emotional rollercoaster ride, through various phases, until things start to settle down. This “ride” can take a year or more.

So. as @grandma points out. time is a great healer…….


gijs
1 month ago

Yup. Still struggling with accepting it. Diagnosed in January. Netflix helps, alcohol does too (don’t overuse it though 😉 ) talking with my closest friend helped me a lot (haven’t told my family). Making plans (for the next 6 months, a year tops) is also a nice and productive distraction. Hang in there, if you need to talk we’re here, PM is also an option ;).


vixen
1 month ago

Hello @renegade, I’m glad you have found Shift. It’s great for company, for interest, for information but mainly to be able to realise that there are others who feel the same as you do, or at least understand. Last year, me and my sister were both diagnosed; me with RRMS and she with PPMS so it’s been a tough old time. I’m not sure I feel that time heals as such, but with time comes acceptance, and more of an understanding of how things are. I probably took about a year for me to reach that stage, as @stumbler suggests. I also agree that not to plan too far ahead is a good approach. Planning short term enables you to have more focus on achievable quality of outcomes. Also, there is no doubt that a good diet will help, along with regular exercise inone form or another. There is that lovely phrase ‘s*** happens’ and this is what has happened to us. But we know that people deal with unexpected things every day, and our particular brand isn’t terminal and is now a manageable condition. Plus, there is so much going on in terms of research and medication that simply wasn’t there twenty, and in some cases, ten years ago.so, although we can’t falsely live in hope, we know that every passing year brings more to the agenda of options for all of us. I will be honest and say that I feel better about myself now, as a person who has made lots of changes as a result of, and also in terms of finding peace of mind (although this is less effective some days than others!). Posting regularly on Shift has been cathartic for me. Some people write, join clubs, create new hobbies, enjoy fine wine, make new friends, set new goals, change their habits of old, etc etc. The world is still your oyster, it’s the same old world, it’s just that your perspective of it might have to change. I’m not sure if this is a good thing or not, but I seem to have developed more of an interest in politics over this time, so Lord knows what that’s all about! Anyways, take care, feel free to ask questions and post post at leisure.


gijs
1 month ago

@vixen politics? And we are supposed to avoid stress! 😭


vixen
1 month ago

Haha, yep. I know right? After a lifetime of disinterest……triggered by Brexit I guess, which will be affecting all of of us (UK)


matesuto
1 month ago

I think the best thing you could do is to start practicing mindfulness. I have psychotherapy sessions every weak with a great professional and she was really happy when I told her I started practicing on my own. You don’t need to make radical changes, but these small things can have a really great impact on your thinking. For example start by writing down good things that happened to you every day. There are some free mindfulness courses at udemy.com you should give it a shot. ☺

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