Last reply 6 years ago
Alternative low cost therapies? LDN acupuncture

I’m curious, who does not take main stream, expensive drugs to treat they’re MS? Do you have good results? I use LDN and vitamin supplementation. I take Copaxone knowing it will probably do nothing for me, but in order to get on better medications that have higher efficacy I have to try the CRAB drugs for at least one year. LDN started working for me after being on it for a couple weeks. My bladder urgency is virtually gone after 8 years of dealing with that. My vision is clearing up and the dizziness is about 85% better. I know it’s not the Copaxone because I have only been on that for 6 weeks and it takes 6 months to a year for that to start working, they say. What do you use?

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DJDsouza
6 years ago

Turmeric, vitamin supplements, padma 28 and changing diet. MS seems to be fairly stable now, but it’s already done it’s damage! 😉


chueykooh
6 years ago

@DJDsouza I forgot to mention diet. Diet does help me tremendously. I try to stay away from carbs, my gastreoenterologist suggested I try the Atkins diet for a week for a non MS related issue. I noticed that after a few days on the diet I was walking better and my MS symptoms were fading fast. Wasn’t what I was trying it for but found it helped my MS by accident. I don’t stay on that Diet though because that particular diet is not really healthy long term.


Anonymous
6 years ago

Hi Chueykooh,

Atkins is good for a little while, but as you mentioned, not a good idea for long term. I suggest, while limiting refined sugars (this is huge) and simple carbs, try adding complex carbs in smoothies with natural sugars (like bananas and berries). For as active as you are, you need some type of carbs (as I’m sure you know) to keep your energy. The efficacy of Copaxone waned over time for me so I had to switch to Gilenya (had already miserably tried Avonex). So I am taking that and have seen a difference. I also supplement with D, fish oil, Alive brand multivitamins (check these out–amazing), magnesium, B6, and B12. The B’s help immensely with energy. You already know the benefits of exercise. Acupuncture is very effective for MS symptoms as is deep tissue massage. My legs give me a lot of trouble, especially because I refuse not to be active, and a deep massage helped me for a few weeks. It was heaven. Thanks for the soapbox opportunity.

P.S. For those who need those refined treats, I just said limit them, don’t discard them completely. And remember that chocolate has antioxidants!


chueykooh
6 years ago

@heather1 Hello, I also supplement with 2500mcg B12 every day as well as 10,000iu D3. I stopped the fish oil because I now have low blood pressure. I drink a lot of green and white tea for antioxidants and consume only natural sugar like those in fruits(once and a while I will sneak a candy bar). The B12 is great for energy. And I also take a daily multi vitamin for men. I try to stay away from chocolate because of the dairy. My allergy tests say I am very slightly sensitive. I have no intolerences to wheat or gluten but I am fairly allergic to rice oddly enough. Go figure, rice.


Anonymous
6 years ago

I had a sneaking suspicion you knew all that already. Too bad about the chocolate, friend. Have you tried massage?


chueykooh
6 years ago

I haven’t. I never thought of it as a therapy for MS. Should I look for someone that specializes in massage for MS? Is there such a thing, or is it just a general deep tissue massage?


Anonymous
6 years ago

I just tried a regular deep tissue massage focusing only on my legs. I did it because a friend recommended it. It was an hour of heaven, I tell you. My legs hurt a little the next day, but I could actually sleep for a couple of weeks following without the spasticity or the leg jerking or the pain. It was wonderful. Just find a local (ahem) reputable massage center and ask them if they specialize in deep tissue massage. It was worth it.


chueykooh
6 years ago

I will definitely look into that tomorrow. I wonder if my insurance will pay for it.


Anonymous
6 years ago

I hope so for your sake. They sometimes do, but if you end up paying for it, keep the receipts and use it on your taxes. What’s your general location? Many massage centers are quite reasonable. An hour massage is usually 50.


chueykooh
6 years ago

I’m in Philadelphia for the next two weeks, then I’m moving to North Carolina. My insurance is good and I know they pay for acupuncture, it’s just been hard to find a reputable acupuncturist that accepts insurance. I haven’t looked into massage therapist around me though, so I have to see what’s available and if they even accept insurance.


Anonymous
6 years ago

Most massage centers do, but the taxes thing is also an option. If you have to pay so much out of pocket for health expenses, you can claim that as a deduction. If you’re close to a large urban center when you move, I’m sure you’ll have plenty of choices. I hope so. It really is worth it, especially since you’re active. I can’t not be active, so the extra stress on my legs warrants some sort of therapy. Btw, I live in Utah and we have the best bike trails in the country.


chueykooh
6 years ago

@heather I used to live in St. George Utah near Zion National Park.


Anonymous
6 years ago

So you know! And geesh, if you’re on the east coast, why are you still up? Go to bed. Don’t you know you have a neurological disease?


chueykooh
6 years ago

@heather1 haha, yeah, but I took a nap this afternoon by accident so I’m still kind of wired. I was actually playing golf in Utah when my first sympton started back in 04 (numbness). I was living in North Idaho at the time but had to go back to Utah to settle the closing on the sale of my house there.


Anonymous
6 years ago

Same way. Sleep eludes me often. I have to practice yoga to settle down. You’ve been everywhere, man. And no, I’m not singing the song.

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