@Tania_Pilz

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Tania_Pilz

Numbness when stressed

So I just recently noticed my left foot feel numb whenever I experience a sudden episode of high stress or get angry. Luckily it's not painful, but the numbness stays for a while. Stress sure is my worst enemy. Does anyone have a similar symptom?

Jothestudentnurse

@Jothestudentnurse

@Tania_Pilz Yeah, definitely. For me, a similar type of thing occurs when I'm under high stress or angry. I distinctly remember a couple of instances: 1) where I got into an argument with my father and 2) right at the beginning of the COVID pandemic, the hospital systems were full capacity in my area, which placed a lot of stress on nursing/medical staff (and the student nurses on those floors, lol). In both cases, I had a numbness in 3 fingers on both my hands (pinky, ring finger, middle finger), which went away after I handled the situation (i.e. no longer stressed).

Stumbler

@Stumbler

@Tania_Pilz , these incidents are best avoided, or managed rationally. They could lead to relapse and further disability. Is getting emotionally involved in these situations worth the risk? 😉

Kayla_Hope

@Kayla_Hope

I can absolutely relate to this! One of my lasting symptoms is numbness in my face. When I experience stress, I notice that the numb sensation increases and becomes much more apparent. <3

Tania_Pilz

@Tania_Pilz

It's such a weird symptom though and as much as I would like to avoid it, sometimes I can help but feel stressed. Any recommendations on how to avoid or control this?

Stumbler

@Stumbler

@Tania_Pilz , this might sound condescending/patronising,but you need to learn to count too 10 slowly and slow down your breathing. Consider whether the situation merits risking your long term health!

cameron

@cameron

The thing is. these symptoms are uncontrollable, in the same way as you couldn't stop butterflies in your stomach or goose pimples on your skin. Once they're there, that's it. MS is like a super-barometer within you, recording and reacting to whatever is going on in your body and brain. It will always find your weak spot, whether that's a cold, fatigue, an infection or stress. Basically, the only way to deal with it is avoidance of the triggers. That implies a long, hard look at your everyday life. This is neither easy or convenient, but it's certainly better than having symptoms. It boils down to an acceptance of the MS, the knowledge that it has to be accommodated, not challenged. My experience is that it's doable and that life can be sweet again. x

amym

@amym

Yes, definitely. My left wrist feels like I'm wearing a watch and left hand gets numb. It can happen before I realise I'm stressed!